Is Pizza a Breakfast Food?

After a shift at work, it’s nice to come home and relax. Grab a bite to eat and settle down. Today, when I came home, I decided to grab a cold beer and heat up some leftover pizza.

Thing is, it’s 7am and I came home from a night shift.

So am I eating breakfast or dinner?

Beer and pizza for dinner sounds not unusual. But enjoy it for breakfast, and that’s far from a healthy lifestyle.

I’m torn at which I am enjoying right now.

Is pizza a breakfast food?

Is drinking a beer with breakfast frowned upon?

When does one day end and the next begin?

Is there a heaven and hell? Do we reincarnate? Is mankind evolving? Or is it too late?

Obviously I’m tired. Gotta stop quoting Monty Python and go to bed.

Haha. Ya, I’m Supposed To Be An Adult.

After the show last night, my son and I were going to meet up with some of my Convention friends for dinner. However the place we were intending on going to would not allow minors in after 9pm. So my friend Dominika joined my son and I to go get a pizza from Dominos. We were already laughing and joking before we walked in to get a our dinner.

Turns out that Dominos has a tv screen that tells you the progress of your pizza order. After we placed our order, it seemed that the cashier didn’t hear my friend’s name correctly. We tried to tell him it was Dom. That is not what he heard.

Her Dong was being made.

Then Dong was in the oven.

Dong needed a Quality Check.

Finally Dong was ready.

We acted about as mature as my 11 year old son. He was giggling uncontrollably as well but didn’t know what a “Dong” was. We were the only ones in the store so our laughs were raucous and hearty. We thanked the staff for a great laugh and we walked back to my car and headed to my friend’s place and continued to laugh with more of our friends.

Sometimes after a long day all you need is to laugh at something so ridiculous it makes you happy. Sharing a laugh with friends makes it even more enjoyable. Ya, I’m an adult laughing like pre-pubescent boy at a dick joke. It felt good.

Daily Fears and Bigger Fears

The other night, on the car ride to picking up dinner, my daughter and I were talking. And she was getting snippy towards me. After some discussion in our short drive, I found out the problem. My 13 year old daughter was scared to buy a pizza.

I had asked her to come with me in order to buy the pizzas. She explained how she didn’t want to talk to the cashier. She was unsure of money interactions. She was straight up stressed out by something that everyone does on a daily basis. She began to show signs of anxiety.

Interactions like this between strangers shouldn’t be difficult. Our daughter has done purchases and sales at numerous conventions over the years- so it surprised me when she told me she was anxious that night. It never dawned on me that this was different. So we rehearsed what she needed to say, how much the pizza would be, and how much change should would get in return.

To ease her mind a bit, I explained that I’m also scared. I am absolutely terrified of going to Tokyo next month. I’ve never been to Tokyo. I’m not going alone either, but taking my wife and three kids. Not only am I going to be in a foreign country- no one I’m going with understands Japanese. Plus I will need to keep a close watch on the kids. Make sure they are staying nearby while we use the trains and travel the streets.

In the end, my daughter did fine buying a pizza. I was with her, but stayed off to the side. I didn’t interject, help or correct her in any way. Afterwards she admitted that it was easy. A little more practice and she won’t need to rehearse her interactions ahead of time. Hopefully she can overcome moments of anxiety on her own.

She enjoyed her pizza with a sense of relief. Although buying pizzas for larger groups is a pain and requires note taking and spreadsheets at the best of times. Just don’t tell her that yet. We need to work on baby steps.

Button Mashing

I will be the first to admit- I suck at most videogames.  I love playing them.  I rarely win.  Put me in a First Person Shooter, and after a few moments, I’m usually the bait.  Probably because I run full force into the middle of the game, guns blazing and not aiming at anything but the ground.  Playing a racing game, and my thumb is on the gas the entire time.  I often can’t judge the upcoming turns and end up off the track.  Add weapons into the game?  Chances are I’ll blow myself up.  Fighting game?  Hahahaha.  I button mash with the best of them.  When my daughter was aged four, she could beat me at my Mortal Kombat 4 upright arcade game.

 

Check out those graphics!

 
I generally succeed at puzzle games.  Tetris, or gem matching style, even Pacman and side scrolling Mario Bros is more my forté. Maybe it’s the 8Bit simplicity.  Maybe I just never matured in my gaming.  Maybe I can focus on the repetition easier than figuring out the next move.  Maybe it’s the pretty colors.

I began playing videogames in 1981.  I was five and played my first arcade game.  I was visiting my mother’s friend for a weekend and we went to get a pizza.  As we picked up the pizza, there was a lone arcade game near the front door.  I was awestruck by the colors, lights and sounds being emitted.  She saw my interest and gave me a quarter to play my very first Pacman.  Later that year, my family received our first home gaming system- The Intellivision.  Since then, I’ve kept up with the newest systems, and the latest tech.  My family has far surpassed my skills at gaming.  But that’s ok, I enjoy watching them and hearing about the adventures they have.  My son loves talking videogames almost as much as playing them.

 

Tall guy in a virtual world.

 
This weekend, my kids and I have had a chance to experience VR.  The artificial worlds are fully immersive and bordering between cartoon and realism.  As I played around in this world, part of my mind knew there were strangers watching me wander around waving my arms and moving my head.  Gaming controls are no longer buttons, but your movements. Your goggles and headset block out sense of the real world.  I could easily spend hours immersed away from reality.  But as these VR games get more intricate, my button mashing skills won’t help me.

 

Next Gen Gamer.

 
I am at the point in my life that I may have to admit that it’s time to pass on the torch. The next generation gamer is my son. May he mash the buttons of VR and succeed.

Back to reality.